Some more A.I. links

This post contains some tabs I have had open in my browser for a while that I’m pasting here both to save them in a place I may remember to look and to share them with others that might find them of interest. I’m afraid I don’t have time, at present, to offer any cogent commentary or analysis – just simply to share…

Untold AI - Christopher NoesselUntold A.I. – “What stories are we not telling ourselves about A.I?”, Christopher Noessel: An interesting attempt to look at popular, sci-fi stories of A.I. and compare them to contemporary A.I. research manifestos and look at where we might not be telling ourselves stories about the things people are actually trying to do.

 

The ethics of crashes with self?driving cars: A roadmapSven Nyholm: A two-part series of papers [one and two ($$) / one and two (open)] published in Philosophy Compass concerning how to think through the ethical issues associated with self-driving cars. Nyholm recently talked about this with John Danaher on his podcast.

Cognitive Bias CodexWEF on the Toronto Declaration and the “cognitive bias codex”: A post on the World Economic Forum’s website about “The Toronto Declaration on Machine Learning” on guiding principles for protecting human rights in relation to automated systems. As part of the post they link to a nice diagram about cognitive bias – the ‘cognitive bias codex‘.

RSA public engagement with AI reportRSA report on public engagement with AI: “Our new report, launched today, argues that the public needs to be engaged early and more deeply in the use of AI if it is to be ethical. One reason why is because there is a real risk that if people feel like decisions about how technology is used are increasingly beyond their control, they may resist innovation, even if this means they could lose out on benefits.”

artificial unintelligence - broussardArtificial Unintelligence, Meredith Broussard: “In Artificial Unintelligence, Meredith Broussard argues that our collective enthusiasm for applying computer technology to every aspect of life has resulted in a tremendous amount of poorly designed systems. We are so eager to do everything digitally—hiring, driving, paying bills, even choosing romantic partners—that we have stopped demanding that our technology actually work.”

Data-driven discrimination: a new challenge for civil society: A blogpost on the LSE ‘Impact of Soc. Sci.’ blog: “Having recently published a report on automated discrimination in data-driven systems, J?drzej Niklas and Seeta Peña Gangadharan explain how algorithms discriminate, why this raises concerns for civil society organisations across Europe, and what resources and support are needed by digital rights advocates and anti-discrimination groups in order to combat this problem.”

‘AI and the future of work’ – talk by Phoebe Moore: Interesting talk transcript with links to videos. Snippet: “Human resource and management practices involving AI have introduced the use of big data to make judgements to eliminate the supposed “people problem”. However, the ethical and moral questions this raises must be addressed, where the possibilities for discrimination and labour market exclusion are real. People’s autonomy must not be forgotten.”

Government responds to report by Lords Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence: “The Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence receives the Government response to the report: AI in the UK: Ready, willing and able?, published on 16 April 2018.”

How a Pioneer of Machine Learning Became One of Its Sharpest Critics, Kevin Hartnett – The Atlantic: “Judea Pearl helped artificial intelligence gain a strong grasp on probability, but laments that it still can’t compute cause and effect.”

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