Reblog> No dogs, no Indians: 70 years after partition, the legacy of British colonialism endures

I found this piece on The Conversation, with reference to the play No dogs, no Indians by Siddhartha Bose (see the video below), by Gajendra Singh, a colleague at Exeter, an interesting and helpful intervention into the partition stories the Beeb is currently running. Definitely worth a read.

No dogs, no Indians: 70 years after partition, the legacy of British colonialism endures

The 70th anniversary of the end of Britain’s Empire in India and the birth of the post-colonial states of India and Pakistan have led to a renewed interest in the portrayal of this distant and under-explored past in British arts and the media.

It does not always make for good history. In the stories told on film, radio and television – from the film Viceroy’s House, to BBC One’s My Family, Partition and Me: India 1947 and Radio 4’s Partition Voices – complexity and context are downplayed in favour of “British” stories of colonialism, anti-colonial movements and partition violence.

Something of an antidote to this was offered by Siddhartha Bose, the London-dwelling, Bombay-raised Bengali poet and playwright, in an evening of readings, performance and discussion as part of the Edinburgh Book Festival‘s own commemoration of the 70th anniversary of partition.

Bose is not a historian and does not pretend to be one, but the evening made for more interesting and innovative public history than that of efforts elsewhere. The event entitled No Dogs, No Indians: A Legacy that Lingers Long, after Bose’s recently published play, attempted to take the audience on a journey into the emotional worlds of urban life in colonial and post-colonial India.

Read the full article.

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